May 1 Registration Deadline Approaching to Sign Up to ‘Show Off Your Skills’

 This year’s SkillsUSA National Week of Service will be sponsored by Stanley Black & Decker. The event will be held May 7-11, and SkillsUSA chapters will have an opportunity to be rewarded.

To qualify, SkillsUSA advisors must register as a participating chapter in the National Week of Service. The first 50 advisors who register their chapter plus 15 or more of their students who register will receive a Drill and Impact Driver Combo Kit from Stanley Black & Decker (www.skillsusa-register.org/signup). All students participating in the chapter event must register individually to receive a free T-shirt (www.skillsusa-register.org/signup). Students must register no later than May 1.

Stanley Black & Decker is sponsoring a “Show Off Your Skills” challenge where chapters will have an opportunity to compete for a grand prize of $10,000 and four finalist prizes of $4,000 each. Additionally, the state association of the winning chapter will receive a grant for $2,500 in appreciation for its efforts in encouraging chapters to participate.

To participate, chapters must produce a 60-second video for social media that highlights the community service they performed during the National Week of Service and the specific trade skills used. There are no limits to video creativity as long as chapters clearly identify how their skills were used in service to others. Contest entries will be accepted from May 7 (9 a.m. EDT) until May 11 (11 p.m. EDT). A SkillsUSA panel will select the five finalists. Those chapter videos will be posted May 14 for a communitywide vote via social media to determine the grand-prize winner. The winner will be announced on May 18, with an awards presentation the following week at the winning school.

For more information about the SkillsUSA Week of Service, go to: www.skillsusa.org/events-training/national-week-of-service/. 

 

Written by

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Executive Director, SkillsUSA Texas